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Palm Sunday

Luke 19:28-40    Jesus’ Triumphal Entry into Jerusalem

After he had said this, he went on ahead, going up to Jerusalem. When he had come near Bethphage and Bethany, at the place called the Mount of Olives, he sent two of the disciples, saying, ‘Go into the village ahead of you, and as you enter it you will find tied there a colt that has never been ridden. Untie it and bring it here. If anyone asks you, “Why are you untying it?” just say this: “The Lord needs it.” ’ So those who were sent departed and found it as he had told them. As they were untying the colt, its owners asked them, ‘Why are you untying the colt?’ They said, ‘The Lord needs it.’ Then they brought it to Jesus; and after throwing their cloaks on the colt, they set Jesus on it. As he rode along, people kept spreading their cloaks on the road. As he was now approaching the path down from the Mount of Olives, the whole multitude of the disciples began to praise God joyfully with a loud voice for all the deeds of power that they had seen, saying,

‘Blessed is the king who comes in the name of the Lord!

Peace in heaven, and glory in the highest heaven!’

Some of the Pharisees in the crowd said to him, ‘Teacher, order your disciples to stop.’ He answered, ‘I tell you, if these were silent, the stones would shout out.’

 

This week is Palm Sunday! Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem riding on a colt. This Biblical scene is rich in meaning. First, it is the fulfillment of an prophecy from Zechariah 9.

9 Rejoice greatly, O daughter Zion! Shout aloud, O daughter Jerusalem! Lo, your king comes to you; triumphant and victorious is he, humble and riding on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey.

Building upon this fulfillment, Jesus’ entry, accompanied by multitudes of people shouting and praising shows Jesus’ kingship. Having a parade/ triumphal entry into a city was a big deal in ancient days. For many, it is the highest praise that can be bestowed upon a citizen. Typically, it is reserved for victorious military generals or other people who have done a great deed for the empire. These parades were initiated by the government, so when Jesus’ entered Jerusalem in this style, with the praises of royalty, it really made the officials upset. No wonder the pharisees told Jesus to have the disciples stop. They were very worried about the scene and expected retaliation from the state about this insubordination. Fittingly, this reading is how we begin our Holy Week experience every year. Beginning with joy and cheers (with anxiety)- moving towards betrayal and trial- culmination in crucifixion and death-but ultimately experiencing the full glory and mystery of Easter.

Thank you so much for being part of our Lenten journey together. This story, this week is what defines our faith.

Blessings~ Pr. Erik.